Las dos realidades del mundo mostradas por Ugur Gallenkus

Por Valentina Rausseo el 30/06/2020

Si hay algo que duele en esta vida, señores, es la verdad… ¡Bien lo dice el refrán! Por lo tanto, es tiempo de que vayamos adentrándonos en trabajos crudos y explícitos, pero reales, como los de Ugur Gallenkus; ésto, con el fin de terminar de comprender que, mientras una parte del mundo está arriba, la otra toca fondo.

Gallenkus es de Estambul. Y su trabajo es realmente increíble.

Muchos de sus seguidores manifiestan a diario que no entienden «cómo este hombre puede hacer que dos composiciones totalmente diferentes, puedan quedar perfectamente combinadas en una sola imagen».

De hecho, para muchos es sabido que otros profesionales (periodistas, fotógrafos, diseñadores o editores) que se dedican a hacer trabajos similares, terminan sufriendo traumas, asistiendo a terapias psicológicas o incluso, muertos por suicidio.

Y Ugur ha sido bastante fuerte, por lo que hemos notado hasta entonces.

Ahora bien. Gallenkus no necesita una presentación netamente formal. Quizás muchos de ustedes conozcan sus obras… Y los que no, pues ¡llegó la hora!

Las dos realidades del mundo mostradas por Ugur Gallenkus

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A woman who had been exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam war gave birth to two children, both physically and mentally impaired. She was helping her daughter move her arms for exercise. Vietnam, Mekong Delta, 2012. Agent Orange is a herbicide and defoliant chemical, one of the "tactical use" Rainbow Herbicides. It is widely known for its use by the U.S. military as part of its chemical warfare program, Operation Ranch Hand, during the Vietnam War from 1961 to 1971. It is a mixture of equal parts of two herbicides, 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D. In addition to its damaging environmental effects, traces of dioxin (mainly TCDD, the most toxic of its type) found in the mixture have caused major health problems for many individuals who were exposed. Up to four million people in Vietnam were exposed to the defoliant. The government of Vietnam says as many as three million people have suffered illness because of Agent Orange, and the Red Cross of Vietnam estimates that up to one million people are disabled or have health problems as a result of Agent Orange contamination. The United States government has described these figures as unreliable, while documenting higher cases of leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and various kinds of cancer in exposed US military veterans. An epidemiological study done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that there was an increase in the rate of birth defects of the children of military personnel as a result of Agent Orange. Agent Orange has also caused enormous environmental damage in Vietnam. Over 3,100,000 hectares (31,000 km2) of forest were defoliated. Defoliants eroded tree cover and seedling forest stock, making reforestation difficult in numerous areas. Animal species diversity sharply reduced in contrast with unsprayed areas. Agent Orange was first used by the British Armed Forces in Malaya during the Malayan Emergency. It was also used by the US military in Laos and Cambodia during the Vietnam War because forests near the border with Vietnam were used by the Viet Cong. The herbicide was also used in Brazil to clear out sections of land for agriculture. via Wikipedia Photo: James Nachtwey @jamesnachtwey

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During their medal ceremony in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City on October 16, 1968, two African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos each raised a black-gloved fist during the playing of the US national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner". While on the podium, Smith and Carlos, who had won gold and bronze medals respectively in the 200-meter running event of the 1968 Summer Olympics, turned to face the US flag and then kept their hands raised until the anthem had finished. In addition, Smith, Carlos, and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human-rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Smith stated that the gesture was not a "Black Power" salute but rather a "human rights" salute. The demonstration is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympics. On the morning of October 16, 1968, US athlete Tommie Smith won the 200 meter race with a world-record time of 19.83 seconds. Australia's Peter Norman finished second with a time of 20.06 seconds, and the US's John Carlos finished in third place with a time of 20.10 seconds. The two US athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty. Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue-collar workers in the US and wore a necklace of beads which he described "were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the Middle Passage (Atlantic Slave Trade)." All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia's former White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals. . Photo: John Dominis @time . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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According of the Landmine Monitor Report 2019, 3,789 people lost their lives due to mines in 2018. The vast majority of recorded landmine casualties were civilians (71%). Children accounted for 54% of all civilian casualties. A land mine is an explosive device concealed under or on the ground and designed to destroy or disable enemy targets, ranging from combatants to vehicles and tanks, as they pass over or near it. The use of landmines is controversial because of their potential as indiscriminate weapons. They can remain dangerous many years after a conflict has ended, harming civilians and the economy. 78 countries are contaminated with land mines and 15,000–20,000 people are killed every year while countless more are maimed. Approximately 80% of landmine casualties are civilian, with children as the most affected age group. Most killings occur in times of peace. With pressure from a number of campaign groups organised through the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, a global movement to prohibit their use led to the 1997 Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction, also known as the Ottawa Treaty. To date, there are 164 state parties to the treaty. One state (the Marshall Islands) has signed but not ratified the treaty, while 32 UN states, including China, Russia, and the United States have not; making a total of 33 United Nations states not party. via Wikipedia . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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"Everything we see in the world is the creative work of women." – Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Mothers are women who inhabit or perform the role of bearing some relation to their children, who may or may not be their biological offspring. Mothers have an important role in the development of children's character. Today, thanks to modern medicine, mom and child mortality declines during childbirth, but millions of mothers and children are at risk due to war and conflict, economic and political problems. According of the Save the Children, State of the World's Mothers report 2015, Every day, 17,000 children die before reaching their fifth birthday. Increasingly, these preventable deaths are occurring in city slums, where overcrowding and poor sanitation exist alongside skyscrapers and shopping malls. Lifesaving health care may be only a stone’s throw away, but the poorest mothers and children often cannot get the care they need. 10 worst countries to be a mother and a child are in the Sub-Saharan Africa – Somalia has the lowest score for well-being of mothers and children among all countries. The report has Norway, Finland and Iceland top the rankings. The top 10 countries, in general, attain very high scores for mothers’ and children’s health, educational, economic and political status. The prime ministers of these three countries are currently women. . Photos: K.M. Asad @kmasad Paula Bronstein @pbbphoto John Moore @jbmoorephoto Shakib Rahmani / Frederic J. Brown @frederic.brown . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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A one-year-old from El Salvador clings to his mother after she turned themselves in to Border Patrol agents on December 7, 2015 near Rio Grande City, Texas. They had just illegally crossed the U.S.-Mexico border into Texas. The mother said she brought her son on the 24-day journey from El Salvador to escape violence in the Central American country. Family separation policy is an aspect of US President Donald Trump's immigration policy. The policy was presented to the public as a "zero tolerance" approach intended to deter illegal immigration and to encourage tougher legislation. It was officially adopted across the entire US–Mexico border from April 2018 until June 2018, but continued unofficially until at least October 2019. Later investigations found that the practice of family separations had begun a year prior to the public announcement. Under the policy, federal authorities separated children from parents or guardians with whom they had entered the US. The adults were prosecuted and held in federal jails, and the children placed under the supervision of the US Department of Health and Human Services. By early June 2018, it emerged that the policy did not include measures to reunite the families that it had separated. This created a child migration crisis. Following national and international criticism, on June 20, 2018, President Trump signed an executive order ending family separations at the border. Since June 2018, despite the official end of the separation policy, hundreds of additional children have been separated from their parents. In March 2019, the government reported that since that time, 245 children had been removed from their families. The House Committee on Oversight and Reform reported in July 2019 that over 700 children have been separated from their parents after the policy's official end. In July, it was reported that as many as five children per day were being separated, and by October, the total had reached 1,090. via Wikipedia . Photo: John Moore @jbmoorephoto @gettyimages . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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Indian villagers gather around a well to fill their pots with water at Natwargadh village, 06 June 2003 some 110 kms from Ahmedabad, the capital city of Gujarat state. Another 46 people have died in a withering heatwave that has fired India for the past three weeks bringing the death toll across the country to 1,393, even as rains began drenching some northeastern and southwestern regions. Many communities have become refugees or immigrants for political, religious and economic reasons in throughout human history. And it will continue to be. It is a fact that there will be and will rises mass migrations in the future due to problems caused by war and global warming. According of the NASA, trends are beginning to emerge, especially at the extremes in the frequency and magnitude of floods and droughts. These trends affect everything from local weather to where crops can grow, and have consequences that will ripple through communities today and in the coming century. More than 5 billion people could suffer water shortages by 2050 due to climate change, increased demand and polluted supplies, according to a UN report on the state of the world’s water. According to news of the New York Times, melting of glaciers due to global warming, rising seas could affect three times more people by 2050 than previously thought, according to new research, threatening to all but erase some of the world’s great coastal cities. These cities, Venice, Bangkok, Mumbai, Alexandria, Basra, Amsterdam, Miami, New York, Rio de Janeiro, Osaka and Shanghai. “If we as homo sapiens do not realize the problem, Atlantis will not be a mythological place.” Uğur. Photo: Unknow @afpphoto . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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British soldiers check Iraqis leaving the southern Iraqi town of Basra, 30 March 2003. Several Iraqi soldiers were arrested trying to escape intense fighting by putting on civilian clothes over their uniforms and attempting to slip through British checkpoints. The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first stage of the Iraq War. The invasion phase began on 19 March 2003 (air) and 20 March 2003 (ground) and lasted just over one month, including 26 days of major combat operations, in which a combined force of troops from the United States-led coalition (the United Kingdom, Australia and Poland) invaded Iraq. The Iraqi port city of Umm Qasr was the first British obstacle. A joint Polish-British-American force ran into unexpectedly stiff resistance, and it took several days to clear the Iraqi forces out. Farther north, the British 7 Armoured Brigade ("The Desert Rats"), fought their way into Iraq's second-largest city, Basra, on 6 April, coming under constant attack by regulars and Fedayeen, while 3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment cleared the 'old quarter' of the city that was inaccessible to vehicles. Entering Basra was achieved after two weeks of fierce fighting, including a tank battle when the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards destroyed 14 Iraqi tanks on 27 March. A total of 11 British soldiers and 395–515 Iraqi soldiers, irregulars, and Fedayeen were killed in Battle of Basra. The conflicts continued for much of the next decade as an insurgency emerged to oppose the occupying forces and the post-invasion Iraqi government. An estimated 151,000 to 600,000 Iraqis were killed in the first three to four years of conflicts. via Wikipedia . Photo: Odd Andersen @oddman1969 @afpphoto . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış 📷

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A Yemeni child suffering from malnutrition is carried by a member of hospital staff at a hospital in the district of Aslam in the northwestern Hajjah province on September 28, 2018. Yemen, one of the Arab world's poorest countries, has been devastated by a civil war. The conflict has its roots in the failure of a political transition supposed to bring stability to Yemen following an Arab Spring uprising that forced its longtime authoritarian president. It sparked a conflict between Sunni and Shia factions that had a claim to rule. The conflict is a proxy war right now. The Saudi-led coalition (United Arab Emirates, Sudan, Senegal, Qatar, United States and France) is backed the Sunni groups. Iran-led coalition (Hezbollah) is backed The Shia groups. According the UN World Food Programme (WFP) spokesperson, today 20 million Yemenis – some 70 per cent of the population – are food insecure, marking a 13 per cent increase from last year. Nearly 10 million of them are one step away from famine. Since 2015, Human Rights Watch has documented about 90 apparently unlawful coalition airstrikes, which have hit homes, markets, hospitals, schools, and mosques. Some of these attacks may amount to war crimes. In 2018, the coalition bombed a wedding, killing 22 people, including 8 children, and in another strike bombed a bus filled with children, killing at 40 children. Human Rights Watch has identified remnants of US-origin munitions at the site of more than two dozen attacks, including the 2018 attacks on the wedding and the bus. Houthi forces, government and pro-government forces, and other armed groups have used child soldiers. In 2017, the UN verified 842 cases of recruitment and use of boys as young as 11, nearly two-thirds of which were attributable to Houthi forces. . Photo: Essa Ahmed @afpphoto . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış 📷

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